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It’s been a while!

But now I’m back!  Sorry to have neglected you for so long. I thought I’d do a little round up of some of the goodies that I’ve read since June, but I’ve held a few back so I can waffle on about them a bit more in the next week or so. I’ve kept it […]

The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer

I consider the fact that I’m still friends with people who I’ve known since I was a teenager (and beyond), to be a good thing. The plus points are obvious – being able to be rude to each other and convince yourself it doesn’t matter, to get drunk together and regale anyone who’ll listen with […]

Standard Deviation by Katherine Heiny

I’ve been married for 7 or 8 years now (both my husband and I regularly forget exactly how long it has been and have to be reminded by friends and family – I count that in our favour for relationship compatibility) and it still never ceases to amaze me how male he is. For instance, […]

The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry

The Essex coastline has always been a bit of a mystery to me. Flat and bleak, I’ve felt it to be the backdrop of artists and poets, who understand the landscape and see things that I, in all my uncultured blindness couldn’t possibly see. And frankly, after having read this book, I feel no affinity […]

Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler

When I was in my twenties, one of the three jobs I had was barmaid at a very popular pub in Clapham, South London. I got the job when new to the area and on a whim one Saturday afternoon after lamenting my lack of cash (despite doing a 9-5) I asked behind the bar […]

She’s come undone by Wally Lamb

I seem to be on a tip of reading books whose characters I don’t like, but still care about at the moment, as Dolores, the narrator and hero of ‘She’s come undone’ is one of the most unlikable people I’ve ever had the pleasure to imagine. Set somewhere in mid 20th Century America, this is […]

The Portable Veblen by Elizabeth McKenzie

Talking squirrels, dysfunctional relationships, parents like those in Meet the Fockers, corporate conspiracies – this book has it all, and frankly I think it struggles a little with it. I spent the whole book wondering how I could take it all seriously when the main character really did communicate with squirrels and we had to […]

The Little Red chairs by Edna O’Brien

This book was rather like reading poetry, so steeped was it in myth and mystery. Once unraveled though, it was rather sad and poignant. It felt a bit like there was a mist over the first half of the book, like a sea fog, as the reader finds their way through the story, trying to […]

Underground Airlines by Ben E Winters

A future where racially motivated slavery is alive and kicking sounds like a nightmare right? Well, this book puts you right in the center of a world where this is happening and makes it feel real and current. With a brilliant plot line and a firm grasp of American legislation, we’re taken on a Bladerunner-esque […]

A brief History of Seven killings by Marlon James

So, the Booker prize winner 2015 finally got an airing on my Kindle (and only because I had it on there from last year and I was somewhere without wifi on holiday so couldn’t download anything else!). And blimey oh Riley, words fail me and then make me swear a lot, with a slightly Jamaican […]